GDS Community Partner Spotlight: Black and Pink

Black and Pink, interview with Jason Lyndon, founder By: Michaela Johnston How did Black and Pink get its start? I started Black and Pink when I got out of prison with the intention of staying connected with the folks that I had been locked up with. People who had looked out for me, I wanted to…

It’s a Battle: Food Availability in an Urban Environment

  By Amanda Brancato Boston houses over 645,000 people and stretches across 90 miles of Eastern Massachusetts. We live in a polished portion of the city, where poverty and public health problems seem irrelevant. But leave the BU Bubble and you’ll find that food inequality is an all-too-real and active issue in Boston. Food security represents economic and health inequalities, and the disparities are vast within urban-populations. With…

Public health and you

By Garrett Prendiville Nobody can know how our public health system will change over the next four years. Not with certainty. But from what has been discussed so far, many health programs and plans will be overhauled. The Secretary of Health heads the public health system of our nation. As part of the Cabinet, the Secretary of Health oversees…

Plates of Compassion

By Sofija Chroneos For years, vulnerable women across Boston have left Women’s Lunch Place with the warmth of fresh food filling their bellies. Food is clarity of mind, the energy these women need to keep up the fight. Women’s Lunch Place (WLP) opened in November of 1982. It’s a safe space, serving women hot lunch three times a week. The…

Get creative with Student Studio!

By Ronnie Finley Creative outlets are a vital part of the student experience. They promote relaxation and self-expression, and they lighten the weight of academic stress and sleep-deprivation. With Student Studio, volunteers help children expand their creative capacities and find a passion for the arts. Volunteers get to channel their own artistic energy while offering children the resources and support they need – double win!  Sarah…

Finding your Forte

By Hannah Harn “It was home. I lived on stage and music was my life,” said Nick Ramirez, a freshman at Wheaton College near Boston, MA. Music education shaped Nick’s life. It started with a class play in the second grade and grew into voice lessons, show choir, and an enduring passion for music. Before finding music, Nick swapped interests. He tried just…

Speaking Up About Global Warming: A Student’s Perspective

By Sam Nelson The chill in Moscow air is more than physical. It permeates through the cracks of Russian law, strangling the voice of its people with its icy grip, freezing words in their throats. Although free speech is technically a right in Russia, in practice, the government cracks down on any language it deems…

Food for Thought

By Amanda Brancato Food justice: the belief that healthy food is a human right. As we head into the holiday season, filled with treats and homemade cooking, we are apt to forget the primary role of food. Eating for pleasure is part of our culture. Roast beef, mashed potatoes, gingerbread, etc. Food is the centerpiece of our holiday table. Eating for pleasure allows us to…

Prisoners are people, too.

By Michaela Johnston Every other Saturday afternoon, Elise Takahama and three other BU Empowerment League volunteers drive to the Boston Pre-Release Center to read short stories, share personal experiences and participate in thought-provoking conversations. The correctional facility—the first amongst its kind in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts—is a structured program that allows gradual transition from prison…

The Keys to Success

By Hannah Harn What’s the key to success in a child’s life? Making Music knows that, for some children, there are 88 keys to success and they’re either black or white.  Learning to play the piano, or any instrument, is a transformative experience for a child. Children often live with magnified emotions; disappointment can be devastating and laughter can be magical.  Though learning…

The Harvest of the McKinley School Garden

By Sam Nelson Tucked away in Boston’s South End, surrounded by French-inspired boutiques and expensive coffee shops, sits the McKinley School. Though the school is often overlooked when compared to neighboring brownstones, its black iron gate stands with humble prestige. The McKinley School has an unconventional approach to education. With a curriculum specifically geared toward students with special emotional, behavioral…